Archive for March, 2013

Failure to Communicate

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

The Republican Party recently released an analysis of their shocking Presidential campaign loss last November.

“Our message was weak; our ground game was insufficient; we weren’t inclusive; we were behind in both data and digital; our primary and debate process needed improvement,” Party Chair Priebus said of Mitt Romney and the GOP’s 2012 loss. “There’s no one solution. There’s a long list of them.”

The report outlines the need to reach out to women, African-Americans, Asian, Hispanic, and gay voters.  They are going to do this by hiring staffers across the country to begin engaging those communities.  They support comprehensive immigration reform, shortening the primary process with fewer debates, moving the convention date earlier in the summer, and investing in more technology.

“To be clear, our principles are sound, our principles are not old rusty thoughts in some book,” Priebus said, but the “report notes the way we communicate our principles isn’t resonating widely enough.”

Sally Bradshaw, a GOP strategist who was also on the committee, added that the GOP “needs to stop talking to itself” and needs to open the tent in order to win presidential elections in the future.

So the Republican Party is admitting that it can no longer win elections depending exclusively on the votes from old angry white men.  That is progress.

The problem is that they are blaming their loss on a failure to communicate.  They continue to insist that if women, minorities, young people, unions, and educated professionals voted for Obama ONLY because they didn’t understand what the Republican message really was.

A wonderful example of this delusional thinking is how Chairman Priebus handled the question of marriage equality.  He held up Republican Senator Rob Portman’s recent public support of same sex marriage as an example of this new philosophy of inclusiveness.

“I think it’s about being decent,” Priebus said. “I think it’s about dignity and respect that nobody deserves to have their dignity diminished or people don’t deserve to be disrespected.

“I think that there isn’t anyone in this room, Republican, Democrat or in the middle, that doesn’t think that Rob Portman, for example, is a good conservative Republican.

“He is. And we know that. … I think that party leaders have to constantly remind everybody that we can’t build a party by division and subtraction. We can only build the party by addition and multiplication. We get that and that’s going to be our endeavor.”

When asked if the Republican Party supported Portman’s position, Prebius said, “It’s his decision. It’s not a matter of whether I support his decision. I support him doing what he wants to do as an elected person and as an American. If that’s his opinion, then I support him having that opinion.”

In other words, the Republican Party is going to continue to oppose marriage equality but will allow some who hold opposing views on the subject to still call themselves Republicans.  The fact that this is newsworthy is testimony to the depths of the problem.

Conservative Republicans are so invested in their positions, that they can’t imagine why anyone familiar with those positions could oppose them.

They can’t imagine why women would object to being told that rape isn’t that bad, only whores use contraception, or if they become pregnant, regardless of the circumstances, they lose the right to make decisions about their own health.

They can’t imagine why Hispanic and Asian citizens object to being told that their efforts to fix a broken immigration system are just a thinly veiled attempt to secure amnesty for criminal behavior.

They can’t imagine why young people reject a party that says that homosexuality is sinful and college education should be available only to those who can afford it.

They can’t imagine why educated people reject a party that says that says that creationism is a science and climate change is a hoax.

The Republican Party doesn’t have a communications problem.  Voters clearly understand where the Republican Party stands.  The real problem is that voters REJECT Republican Party positions.

The best evidence of this is the most recent budget debate.  House Republicans passed a reworked version of the Ryan budget that voters had just rejected in November.  In fact, this new budget was, if anything, more cynical than the previous one.  If you recall, the campaign budget had a math problem.  This new budget solves some of the math problem by KEEPING the recently approved tax increases that Ryan and Romney campaigned so hard against.  It also kept the taxes included in Obamacare, which Ryan claimed were job killers, while repealing the rest of the healthcare bill.

The Republican Party doesn’t have a communication problem.  In fact, some of the steps they have recommended (fewer debates and a shorter primary season) may be intended to reduce the amount of information the party shares with the public.

The Republican Party has a philosophical problem.  They underestimate the intelligence of the American voter and their ability to tell the difference between what the party says and what it does.