Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Colorado Bear attack

Sunday, May 13th, 2018

A 5-year-old girl was injured early Sunday morning after a bear attacked her outside her Colorado home when she went to investigate a noise in the yard, officials said.

The girl, who was later reported to be in good condition, went outside around 2:30 a.m. after hearing noises in the yard in East Orchard Mesa, above the Colorado River corridor in Grand Junction, that she thought was her dog, FOX31 Denver reported.

He mother told Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials she heard her daughter scream and saw a large black bear dragging the girl.

The bear dropped the 5-year-old when the mother began screaming at the animal, according to the report.

The girl was taken to the hospital with serious injuries. FOX31 reported she was in good condition Sunday night.

Officials are still tracking the animal and asked residents in the area to report any bear sightings. Residents were also urged to keep put food inside and secure their trash.

And the Morel of the Story is?

Saturday, May 5th, 2018

Around these parts Mothers Day usually signals the start of mushroom hunting season.  Mushrooms are serious business here in Michigan!  Hunters protect, guard, and defend their favorite hotspots and would never turn anyone on to where they find these delicacies year after year!

If you don’t have your own “hotspot” and you love eating those delicious black and white morels then be prepared to pay big bucks to those that do have a “hotspot!” I have seen grocery bags of them go from $60-100 dollars.

I was thinking that this wet, cold, late snow spring would hold back the mushroom harvest for a week or so, but my wife found one today peeking through a pile of leaves in our side yard.  Two years ago I found 6 huge ones in the same spot.  I guess the recent sunshine and mid 70’s temperatures have worked their magic.  I may just have to take a little stroll through the woods tomorrow.

When I do get my hands on a few of those delicious “fungi”  I like to fry them up in butter.  First though I dip them in milk and eggs then roll them in flour, salt, and pepper.  I don’t need a sirloin to go along with them, but that would be nice.  As far as I’m concerned they “stand alone” on my list of Natures Bounty!  the pleasure derived from eating these delicacies is the reason Mushroom Hunters will never reveal from where the “bounty” came.  My lips are sealed!

2018 Michigan Turkey Hunt!

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

My last post was titled “Weather will play a big part in Turkey opener!”  That turned out to be so very true, at least for me!

I arrived at my cabin on Friday before the Monday opener.  I immediately got my Dodge 1500 4×4 stuck at the entrance to my driveway where the road commision had stacked up about 3 feet of wet heavy snow and ice.  My hired “plowing service” had not touched my driveway from the record snowfall of 5-6 days ago, and I was left to “dig my truck out of this snowbank!  The frame was hung up and it took everything I had to get free of this “bad decision” to bust through this barricade!  Once through I had to deal with 10-12 inches of snow that was making everything more difficult!

Actually the temperatures were in the 50’s and 60’s for the opening two days so snow was melting making a muddy mess of everything!  I had scouted Saturday and Sunday and never saw any sign of birds in the area?  To make this story short I only saw two hens in three days of hunting and never had a Tom answer my hen calls!  I have never failed to take a turkey around my place during the spring hunt, but then I’ve never hunted in these extreme weather conditions either!  This is the first year (in many) I can remember getting “skunked”while pursuing a turkey dinner.

As bad as it was around my place further north in Gaylord my brother Darryl, his son Derek, and his two grandsons Tanner and Tristan were doing a whole lot better.  The snow was actually much deeper in the Gaylord area “snowbelt” but they were hunting turkey “heaven!”  They were seeing 40-60 birds every time they went out, even though the Tom’s were already “henned” up!  It’s hard to call a tom away from his “girlfriend” but Darryl and Derek were able to do just that, as Tanner and Tristan put the “smackdown” on two trophy Toms!  Tanner shot his (with a bow) opening morning at 30 yards, and Tristan got his Wednesday morning at 14 yards with his bow.  Tanners bird had multiple beards while Tristan’s had a long 11 inch beard!  Way to go guys!  That’s quite an accomplishment to take a turkey with bow and string.  Meanwhile could you please save me a drumstick?  My freezer will hold no wild turkey this spring, but there’s always hope for the fall hunt!

Mike

Weather Will Play a Big Part in Turkey Opener!

Saturday, April 14th, 2018

Eight more days till turkey opener and I’m the “least” excited I’ve ever been!  One of the largest Spring storms to ever hit the state of Michigan is pounding the northern woods with rain, snow, ice, and high winds!  For three days this onslaught is forcast for my favorite turkey hunting grounds!  I do not like hunting in the snow for a bird (turkey) that loves to strut in the sunshine and look for a pretty lady!

With the ice, wind and heavy snow I could loose power or have trees down all over my property!  The forecast for this upcoming week is one of gloom and doom also!  Usually the 1st hunt for turkey season is your best, but I’m thinking those birds may wait awhile to get into the swing of things looking for a hen.  In years past I’ve gone with the month long 3rd. hunt which may turn out to be the best chance to get a bird.

Oh well not much anyone can do about that!  I just hope the snow is melted by the 23rd. and I don’t have to plow my driveway to get into my place.

Mike

Spring Turkey Season 2018

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2018

The Spring turkey season is fast approaching, but you would never know it by the weather!  I can’t remember a longer more drawn out winter (it’s supposed to be Spring) than this one.  Our 10 day weather forecast calls for 8 days of a snow/rain mix and temperatures in the 30’s and 40’s! Their still snowmobiling up around our cabin!  I can’t even get to excited about scouting due to the lousy weather!

I have seen some activity down here in Monroe as the Tom”s are still “bunched” up and not seeking any “love” just yet.  I drew the first hunt so I hope some sunshine breaks through the clouds and gets those Tom’s after the hen’s!  I’m thinking those with a third hunt are going to have a better chance than us early birds!  We shall see?

I’ll post some photo’s from the last few years just to get everyone in the turkey hunting “zone!

Mike

The Ice Is Melting and Fishing Season Is Just Around the Next Snowflake

Saturday, March 31st, 2018

Hopefully these photo’s will get your minds off the lousy weather here in Michigan, knowing that “change” is coming somewhere in the future.  Getting on the water and feeling the “tug” of a fish on the line always changes your perspective of the day!  Come on warm weather!

Coyote Attacks Young Girl

Monday, March 19th, 2018

A 9-nine-year-old girl was attacked by a coyote outside of her home in North Carolina.

On Thursday evening, the animal approached Madilyn Fowler on her porch, leaving her with minor injuries, including scratches on her bottom, back and face.

“The coyote had been attempting to attack the family dog before this,” the Davie County Sheriff’s Office wrote on Facebook. “The Victims Mother was able to get the coyote to stop the attack.”

It’s unclear whether Fowler was exposed to rabies; however, the sheriff’s office issued an advisory to those in the area to stay guarded, especially considering the coyote couldn’t be located after the attack.

“We recommend that residents in the area be cautious with their pets and when outdoors for the next two weeks,” the advisory message on Facebook says. “An animal infected with rabies normally expires within two weeks, but can spread the disease to other animals and humans that it comes into contact with.”

The latest attack comes just weeks after a rabid coyote threatened a family in Huntersville, North Carolina. In a minute-long video posted to YouTube, the animal is seen walking alongside a fence and then its heard aggressively growling and biting the car’s bumper. The coyote has since been tracked and killed by the local police department.

In addition to coyotes, other animals such as raccoons, skunks and foxes can carry rabies too. Although human deaths from rabies are extremely rare in the United States—only a few cases each year—the disease presents a serious problem in other countries. More than 59,000 people die globally, primarily in Africa and Asia, from rabies each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coyotes are opportunist and will prey on family pets and livestock if available.  They have definitely become quite at home with suburbia, and that’s partly because of the abundance of dogs and cats available for a quick snack.  Another factor is they are not hunted in these area’s and have lost their fear of “man!”  It’s just been a matter of time before a child would be considered “fair game” on a coyotes dinner list!

Several years ago my brother in law shot a “yote” that had been stalking his ducks around a backyard pond.  I once watched a coyote stalk a backyard full of chickens in broad daylight.  Once upon a time there was a $25 dollar bounty here in Michigan for killing a coyote.  That bounty was removed decades ago, and now we are seeing the results of an overabundance of the crafty critters!

The U.S. Is Losing Ground On It’s “Hog” Problem!

Sunday, March 18th, 2018

Native American Crafts Keep My Winters Interesting!

Thursday, March 15th, 2018

Over the winter months when it’s to cold, snowy, and windy for an “old man” to venture to far from his fireplace there has to be something to occupy his time!  For me it’s when I work on my traditional Native American crafts.  This winter I have been busy on walking sticks adorned with deer horns, feathers, leather, and beads.  I also made a couple dance sticks and am working on some turkey feather fans.  I also make Native American necklaces.

I have several tanned deer hides I use for the leather and tons of turkey feathers, imitation eagle feathers, and other various feathers I have collected.  I have a few pieces of mink hide and have another one being processed right now.  Rabbit fur is used in many cases and any other hides I can beg borrow and steal!

The beads and bones, sinew, bells, cones, etc come from Native american trading post!  I have done Tomahawks, peace pipes, quivers, lances, talking sticks, smudge feathers, and ceremonial arrows. I have sold a few items and donated to dinner/auctions, but it’s a way I can relax and commune with my Native American heritage.  My great Grandmother was a woodland Cree from Saskatewan, and my mothers side are all Canadians.

It’s a great way for me to relax and be creative as I wait for Spring turkey season!  I will post a few photo’s of my work.

Mike

 

Japan’s Wild Boar Problem Continues To Grow!

Monday, March 12th, 2018

Less than 20 years ago, the only challenges for the 100 residents of the tiny island of Kakara, off southwest Japan, were the elements and ensuring the fishermen’s catch could get to market on time.

Today, the islanders are outnumbered three to one by wild boar who feast on their gardens and are becoming increasingly aggressive and territorial.

The problems facing the residents of Kakara are being repeated across Japan, with boar numbers exploding as rural populations decline.

Japan’s rapidly ageing and shrinking population is part of the reason behind the increase in wild boar, as older rural populations die out, leaving towns and villages empty. Meanwhile, young people are also moving to the cities in search of work. The number of people with shotgun licenses has also fallen sharply in recent years.

And as the people leave, the boar are moving in.

The first boars apparently swam to Kakara, which covers a mere 1 square mile and sits between Fukuoka and Saga prefectures, but have been in hog heaven ever since.

They have found a place with no natural predators and plenty of crops, such as pumpkins and sweet potatoes, that the local people grow in their back gardens.

Other than farming and fishing, the island’s only other industries were small-scale tourism and growing camellia for use in cosmetics, Kyodo News reported, but the famously aggressive boar have chased the tourists away and eaten the camellia plants.

Local children cannot play outdoors for fear of being attacked and residents have stopped walking even relatively short distances for fear of encountering one of the aggressive creatures.

Desperate islanders have set countless traps and catch around 50 of their tormentors every year, but that figure is far outstripped by the rapidly breeding boar population – a sow can give birth to as many as six piglets a years.

Some residents are even suggesting that they should evacuate the island, abandoning it to the wild pigs. Across Japan, confrontations between boar and man are inevitable as the hog population rises, and rural media are frequently reporting incidents in which humans have come face-to-face with large beasts.

In October, a large specimen barrelled into a suburban shopping mall on the island of Shikoku, biting five staff and causing mayhem before it was captured.

In December, two boars managed to get into a high school in Kyoto and panicked students had to be evacuated.

Elsewhere, they are finding their way out of the forests and fields and into train stations, gardens and school sports grounds.

And with few checks on the boars’ territory, they are growing larger as well as more numerous.

In February, farmers in north-east Japan caught a male that weighed in at 280 pounds, well over the average 220 pounds of boars in Europe.

They are also expanding their range into areas that were previously considered too inhospitable, taking over villages with shrinking populations.

They are being given even greater licence to roam in areas close to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, abandoned in March 2011 in the aftermath of the destruction of three of the plant’s reactors and the release of radiation across the surrounding countryside.

Local people fled to safety; the wildlife remained and thrived.