Nor’easter 2011 No Fluke; Worsening Weather and Related Economic Downfall Predicted Years Ago

Scientists predicted that there will likely be an increase in precipitation both in winter and spring for the eastern U.S., fires and drought for the southwest, bigger and worsening storms across the country in general, and a residual economic downfall in hard hit areas. Maybe the public should have taken the initiative to become more informed instead of blindly listening to their politicians relative to climate change. Unfortunately, I’m already seeing blogs popping up following yesterday’s Nor’easter blast on our east coast that question “global warming,” since there was so much snow and early. Be aware that precipitation means snow not just rain. We have El Nino conditions where cold air comes down on us suddenly and ferociously. And the U.S. cannot afford the increasing expense of attacks by Mother Nature.

I know there have been articles and news reports explaining to the public that global warming does not mean temperatures across the globe will be hotter EVERYWHERE. And worsening storms year round should be enough to convince the public that climate is indeed changing. I’ve blogged about both many times myself. As science is discovering, massive ice ages and warming events of the past did not encompass the entire globe. It may be better to state that climate change is brought about by global warming. Climate change means bigger, worse, extreme, and chaotic weather, and/or for places that were always cold it may be warmer, and places that were always warm may become colder. Change encompasses ANYTHING and EVERYTHING. It means there will be chaotic and varying weather events worldwide. We’ve seen enough to know better at this point.

I’ve put together a list of my own blogs on the subject of climate change due to global warming and can’t believe how soon we forget:

July 14, 2009

Predictions from Completed Government Report on Global Warming

A 196 page report entitled “Global Climate Change Impact on U.S.” predicts the scenarios we’ve already heard but failed to heed so far like worse weather, and property loss and the domino effect on everything else including the economy.

The report appears to be nonpartisan in nature, commissioned by the Bush Administration in 2007 and concluded just recently in the Obama Administration. It does reassure at the conclusion that a worsening scenario can be still be fixed.

The Midwest or Great Lakes region report is accurate. We are seeing more snow in winter and rain in early spring, and then we dry up the rest of the summer into fall. The bad thing is I think we’re getting more and windier too.

The good news is that the harshest impacts of future climate change can be avoided if the nation takes deliberate action soon. This can be done through a balanced mix of activities to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions and adaptation to the otherwise unavoidable impacts.”

Unfortunately, there seems to be an economic downfall attached to each region as the result of global warming too. CEO of World Wildlife Fund expressed, “Already Americans are paying the price for the lack of action on climate change in the past and those costs will only rise. It’s time for Congress to act. ”

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2009/07/predictions-from-completed-government-report-on-global-warming/

February 9, 2010

The Likely Increase in Precipitation in Winter and Spring

The likely increase in precipitation in winter and spring was one of the key issues reported by the U.S. Global Change Research Program not long ago. It was relative to the Midwest…Well this is a winter downpour.

The U.S. has been hit by some record-breaking snowfalls for all time. One hundred million Americans have been affected by the current snowfall that’s not over yet. That’s one third of our entire population. This massive storm affects 26 states. In some places citizens just got their power back from the last blast. Six thousand flights have been canceled throughout the east coast.

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2010/02/the-likely-increase-in-precipitation-in-winter-and-spring/

February 23, 2010

Scientists Other Than IPCC Affirm Consensus on Global Warming

[]There needs to be much more communication to the public in laymen’s terms so that the public understands the science behind climate change and doesn’t buy into the misleading spin attached to every mistake turned up. The scientists at the AAAS symposium “expressed shock at the political effects of the disclosures (misleading info relative to climategate) and said the impact was far out of proportion to the overwhelming evidence that human activity is changing the Earth’s climate.”

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2010/02/scientists-other-than-ipcc-affirm-consensus-on-global-warming/

February 11, 2010

One Hundred Sixty Billion Tons of Snow

And like my recent blog, the increase in precipitation in the Midwest was predicted in the recent U.S. Climate Research Report. ABC ended their report with the same retort by scientists. They predicted this would happen. There will be bigger, and far worse storms year round. Amen.

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2010/02/one-hundred-sixty-billion-tons-of-snow/

February 10, 2010

Mother Nature Tops Off Snowmageddon with an Earthquake Near Chicago

Is anyone paying attention to Mother Nature yet? She’s slapping us in the face to wake up. But we’ll probably just toss off this doozy of a snowstorm as a freak. That is until around 4:00 am this morning a 3.8 earthquake rattled near Elgin, Illinois. It was felt in Chicago. The earthquake might have gained a little more attention to Mother Nature.

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2010/02/mother-nature-tops-off-snowmageddon-with-an-earthquake-near-chicago/

March 15, 2010

Thousands Without Power First from Snow, Now Rain

The heavy snowfalls across America were heralded to be from global cooling when in fact the snowfalls were the excessive precipitation predicted due climate change. Now that it is actually warm and torrential rainfall and high winds hit the same areas burdened earlier with snow, deniers need a new explanation.

According the Bangor News Daily, “The storm, which battered parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut on Saturday with gusts of up to 70 mph, struck about two weeks after heavy snow and hurricane-force winds left more than a million customers in the Northeast in the dark. More than a half-million customers in the region lost electricity at the peak of Saturday’s storm, and more than 485,000 were waiting for power to be restored Sunday morning.”

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2010/03/thousands-without-power-first-from-snow-now-rain/

This is enough when read back to back, although I could add in the summer’s record breaking heatwaves, as-well-as, the summer before. Heatwaves will surely happen again as predicted too. How much will it take until there is a public outcry for energy policy that directly addresses a decrease in greenhouse gases while diverting subisides to established business like big oil to become incentives to alternative energy companies, and an increase in public awareness to action at the same time?

Share

Earlier Predictions Were Right; More Rain/Snow Less Insurance Coverage

I ran across an article on the Science Daily website from 2006 that predicted more precipitation both summer and winter in some parts of N. America. The article also explained that rising WARM, moist air is the cause of increased precipitation. This coincides with an older article from Mortgage News Daily website about warming ocean temps, which account for rising warm moist air that contributes to a more intense hurricane season too.

After the recent snow blasts in the U.S., the extremes of snowfall were called “hard core evidence” of global cooling instead of acknowledging that warmer moist air is actually causing it. This was an area of discussion on ABC World News recently, whether rain or snow is an indicator of global cooling. No it’s simply increased precipitation, and it was predicted by science.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2006/0205-harder_rain_more_snow.htm.

Science remains adamant about increasingly severe storms due to global warming. Another article on the Science Daily website about a year ago casts the same scenario for more frequent and severe storms.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2009/0109-global_warming_causes_severe_storms.htm.

Are U.S. citizens ready to weather more and greater storms? Most of us think the housing market is bad now, if annual storms get increasingly worse insurance will not support those hit again and again. An article on Mortgage News Daily website made the point, “If you can’t find insurance you can’t get a mortgage. [] If weather-related claims continue at the pace of the last few years it is unlikely that even state and federal coverage will be sustainable.” Houses simply won’t sell because of lack of insurance. The 2007 article continued: “Victim after victim, pawing through the wreckage of their homes, told reporters that they were uninsured, either because their premiums had skyrocketed into the realm of unaffordable over the last few years or because their insurance had been cancelled outright.”

The article went on to list the insurance companies that dropped policies on states along the eastern seaboard already. Combine that with dropped policies along the California coastline and it isn’t rosy. The article acknowledged, “The effects of such warming [global] are still being debated but some estimates are that ocean temperatures will increase 1 degree or more (contributing to the nourishment of hurricanes which are expected to increase in intensity and become a threat to more northern locations than before)…” We saw that during the last hurricane season storms traveled much farther up the eastern seaboard in the Atlantic.

Read the whole article:

http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/262007_Homeowners_Insurance.asp.

Share

One Hundred Sixty Billion Tons of Snow

I was writing something else and watching World News on ABC just now and had to write about what I just heard. And that is the amount of snow that has piled up–160 billion tons. In light of the recent earthquake along the New Madrid fault in Illinois, and because the news showed the roof of a fire station caving in from snow weight, I couldn’t help but think about weight on the earth’s surface? If the Midwest gets hit with another storm on Monday, the weight will surely increase. Does that in anyway have an effect on tectonic plates, or pressure beneath?

Besides the weight, ABC news offered a look at the excessive snow relative to global warming. Both Rush Limbaugh and Senator Inhofe jumped on the misconceived idea that snowstorms are somehow hard-core evidence of global cooling? This is an example of really convoluted thinking because:

1. It’s winter in the Midwest. It’s supposed to be cold now.
2. A stalled jet stream allowed Arctic air to travel farther south than usual this year.
3. Most importantly SNOW IS PRECIPITATION in the winter and therefore is not proof of global cooling but rather increased precipitation.

And like my recent blog, the increase in precipitation in the Midwest was predicted in the recent U.S. Climate Research Report. ABC ended their report with the same retort by scientists. They predicted this would happen. There will be bigger, and far worse storms year round. Amen.

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/2010/02/the-likely-increase-in-precipitation-in-winter-and-spring/.

Share

Mother Nature Tops Off Snowmageddon with an Earthquake Near Chicago

Is anyone paying attention to Mother Nature yet? She’s slapping us in the face to wake up. But we’ll probably just toss off this doozy of a snowstorm as a freak. That is until around 4:00 am this morning a 3.8 earthquake rattled near Elgin, Illinois. It was felt in Chicago. The earthquake might have gained a little more attention to Mother Nature.

The fault line involved in the Illinois earthquake is the New Madrid and is about 150 miles long, covering 5 states and is relatively active. Because the earthquake happened in Illinois it gets more press, but if you look at the map of the U.S., New Brunswick, Canada just up from Maine, also suffered an earthquake last week as did Texas, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Missouri while California, Washington state, Nevada, Utah, Montana, Alaska, and the big island of Hawaii had a potpourri of seismic activity. And in one spot in Yellowstone National Park as many as 6 or more small rattlers shook from last Thursday through Sunday.

See the map of earthquakes: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsus/.

Earthquakes aside, all I keep remembering lately is a documentary I watched on either Nat Geo or Discovery or PBS??? about the possibility of an increase in massive storm systems across the U.S. I hope most Americans realize that our country is prone to outrageous weather anyway because our land mass spans a broad range of climates, and our topography varies so greatly. Climate change will only increase the intensity of areas prone to hot, dry weather or cool, wet climates making our weather as a whole even more divergent, which doesn’t bode well for our future and massive storm systems. Think about it. Mixing hot, dry air, and cold, moist air is a recipe for storms and if the climate differences increase in intensity with even hotter, drier climates clashing with cooler, wet climates, oh boy.

Much of what I watched about an increase in massive storms was supposition about groups of tornadoes uniting into one massive funnel spanning states. The recent sighting of 14 out of season tornadoes across Texas could be the beginning of that prediction but I don’t remember much in the documentary about snowstorms. If it was about winter weather patterns at all, it was about ice storms snapping power lines at a time of year when people need heat.

In any event, we don’t really need a documentary anymore about the possibility of huge snowstorms amassing across a third of the U.S. affecting 100 million people now do we? It’s too incredulous to believe but Mother Nature prevails on that one.

New Madrid Fault Line: http://www.showme.net/~fkeller/quake/sitemap.htm.

Share

The Likely Increase in Precipitation in Winter and Spring

The likely increase in precipitation in winter and spring was one of the key issues reported by the U.S. Global Change Research Program not long ago. It was relative to the Midwest. When I think of the word “likely” it has a future connotation to me. I wouldn’t think it meant 6 or 7 months. I blogged about the report in July. Increased precipitation is here already although winter precipitation sounds so light doesn’t it? We think, “just some flakes of snow.” Downpours were on the list to likely increase too. Well this is a winter downpour.

The U.S. has been hit by some record-breaking snowfalls for all time. One hundred million Americans have been affected by the current snowfall that’s not over yet. That’s one third of our entire population. This massive storm affects 26 states. In some places citizens just got their power back from the last blast. Six thousand flights have been canceled throughout the east coast. We’ve been lucky here in SE Michigan so far. It isn’t all that bad yet but we’ve got until tomorrow morning. The storm is gaining strength from warm moisture from the south and we could get 4-6 more inches.

This snowstorm that is so close to the last one also poses a new problem—snow weight on roofs. One university was shoveling off its roof because a dorm ceiling cracked from the roof above. The weight could really hurt shrubs and bushes too. Before it’s all over we may see some more record snowfall.

The science behind the climate change report was certainly right about precipitation. And scientists warning that climate change will more than likely happen sooner than later is an understatement this winter.

Read the Midwest report: http://www.globalchange.gov/publications/reports/scientific-assessments/us-impacts/regional-climate-change-impacts/midwest.

Share

National Geographic’s Planet Earth

If you ever had any questions about a anything relating to earth and its functions, how it all happened, how our climate is changing and why, how we know this stuff, and many other things, watch National Geographic’s presentation “Planet Earth.” This is family stuff, enlightening, interesting, and a little bit scary.

Some of the presentations areexplosive. It’s a little mind boggling how they are able to present prehistoric earth with video footage of events and places from the present. I watched the one about ice mass, and last night was about earthquakes, ending with volcanic eruptions. There is as much action as the latest Rambo movie. My husband was perturbed we changed channels from the movie “Mash,” but said it was really a great presentation and he wants to see more of it now. You’ll find yourself saying “Wow” and “I didn’t know that!” more than once.

I know some people don’t get the National Geographic Channel, but the DVD set of “Planet Earth” is available. It’s better than any encyclopedia books I was brought up with. Maybe if they had this type of learning tool back then more of us would have went into science.

“Planet Earth” is on every night this week, beginning at 9:00 pm on the National Geographic Channel. Tune in.

Share

Wicked Weather Last Night

So Monroe, MI, how about that weather last night? Monroe doesn’t usually get anything that bad, especially my area near Lake Erie. Usually the lake just sucks out the storm, but last night blew the shingles off my roof. And they were only 2 years old! Straight-line winds just dropped in out of nowhere. I actually went to sit in the bathroom with my bird and one cat that doesn’t like storms. I wasn’t thinking tornado, but I was thinking scary thoughts. My only clue that it wasn’t going to be too bad is that there were birds, and mallard ducks eating under my bird feeder up until the moment that wind hit.

It could have been worse. Bloomfield Hills and counties North of us really got walloped with trees landing on houses and no power since Friday for some.

It’s no wonder weather events are extreme. Our country is experiencing some pretty diverse climate conditions all at once. Washington state was in the 30′s and expecting snow today. Places like Racine, WI got flash floods. Racine is bewildered because that NEVER happened before. And parts of Arkansas and N. Carolina are drought stricken. Mix snow, floods, heat, and droughts together and it’s little wonder we have climate explosions where bad weather just drops in like the 117 mph winds that ran through the Columbus, OH area last night.

We’re already greeted with a pretty wicked windy season and it’s only June 10th. I’velost some shingles. I just hope I can hang onto my new awning until windy season is over, and I hope no one suffered anything worse.

Share

100-Year Old Mines Are Still Causing Environmental Problems

In 1880, Leadville, CO was a silver mining town with a population of about 40,000 people. By 2005, Leadville had less than 2700 citizens but as a part of Lake County with close to 8000 residents, the area and its citizens are in serious danger from those old mining camps. I wanted to find out more about Leadville so I looked at Wikipedia. According to Wikipedia Leadville was full of lead about 1 million short tons but also produced over 2.9 million ounces of gold, 240 million ounces of silver, 785 thousand short tons of zinc and 53 thousand short tons of copper.

Many years of mining left behind substantial contamination of the soil and water, so that the EPA designated some former mining sites in Leadville as Superfund sites designated for clean up. Wikipedia stated that according to authorities, the town is now 98% cleaned up and the Superfund designation is about to expire. Well guess again.

The Lake County Commissioners declared a state of emergency in Colorado today. As I understand it, because mines are hollow, the water that seeps down the walls and across the floor may carry with it toxic contaminants like lead. If allowed to run free as surface water runoff, it poses a hazardous waste problem to the area. During WWII the Bureau of Mines dug drainage tunnels to direct and contain the runoff. The Leadville mines tunnel was later sold to the Bureau of Reclamation as many of them were. According to an article in the Vail Daily News, “in 1992, a lawsuit by the Sierra Club prompted the construction of the tunnel treatment plant.” And everyone was supposed to live happily ever after.

However, there is a cave in somewhere in that mine now blocking the tunnel, and water is building up on the one side of the cave-in due to heavy snowfall and ice melt. It’s building up to a tune of “over a billion gallons of toxic acid and metal-laden water to form a pool at the headwaters of the Arkansas River, according to Commissioner Hickman. He explained that the water is now nearly 200 feet high and continues to apply pressure against the cave-in.” The same Vail Daily article said that the Denver Post stated “snow pack levels in the Upper Arkansas Valley are 163 percent of normal,” so more water than ever is going to continue to apply pressure. Commissioner Hickman said that he is afraid that the environmental degradation of the Arkansas River will be beyond anyone’s comprehension if the whole thing explodes. Lately, there appears to be a back-up situation from Leadville’s mine tunnel to the California Gulch tunnel treatment plant also.

The Bureau of Reclamation knows about the problem, has taken some steps but is moving too slowly for the commissioners. The commissioners should be on edge. This administration is not known for its quick action during human disasters, or for their prevention. The Bureau of Reclamation has been accused of failing to warn citizens when the Teton Dam in Idaho gave way in 1976. Fourteen people died and 300,000 acre-feet of water surged through the area causing one billion dollars in damages. A couple of Senators, Salazar and Wiens, have voiced their concern over the Leadville tunnel. Salazar accused the Bureau of not cooperating with the EPA or Colorado’s Dept. of Health. Other than that nothing much has been done as the water continues to build. There is a trailer park situated right where the water will rush through if the dam gives way.

All I can think of is the recent push to mine all over the country again eventually leaving more void pockets like the existing abandoned mines in Leadville. Mountain top strip mining, coal mining, and even in Michigan, mining for copper is on the agenda once again. Look at the age of the mines in Leadville that are still causing a problem and costing millions from the Superfund to clean up or contain. The U.S. hasn’t fully remedied the problems from mines that over 100 years old, but is willing to invest in new mining all over the country again? Add to that the Bureau of Reclamation’s failure to act on the behalf of citizen’s safety as it has in the past, and even though the EPA has pressured them with concern about this particular tunnel for years. Since, I don’t have much faith in the Bush EPA, this must be really bad for them to pay attention. It’s bad enough for us to pay attention and keepa watchful thumb on excessive mining in the future, especially for filthy fossil fuel like coal.

http://www.vaildaily.com/article/20080214/NEWS/972891293.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leadville,_Colorado.

Share

El Nino Out, La Nina In, and the Northwest Gets Battered

The Northwest is getting beat up by the weather again this winter season. I started to write a blog on Dec. 22 last year about El Nino, but didn’t actually publish it until April. It talked about El Nino but did not mention that when El Nino leaves La Nina arrives and that is what beats up the northwest. The east coast got beat up by a noreaster in the spring, and this summer the southeast dried up. We’re in for more of the same with the arrival of La Nina.

This is all confusing to me also. But some of the predicted hurricanes didn’t appear in 2006 and 2007 because of El Nino’s sudden reappearance. La Nina usually follows El Nino where cooler water surface temperatures kick up hurricanes to the gulf, and where La Nina may last up to 3 years. It looks like global warming is certainly causing a rise in more El Ninos. We’ve not had any big hurricanes because of El Nino’s reappearance.

Predictions that are made within proper predictions for both El Nino and La Nina are still true to form. But global warming is having an impact on the occurrence of both. I read my blog that related the predictions of the scorching dryness in the southeast we had this summer. La Nina brings about drenching rain and floods and wind in the northeast, while the southeast dries up. The northeast gets really lousy spring weather. Last year New York flooded with high winds.

Still confused? I listed a couple of good websites with good explanations about El and La, LOL, and my blog from last year. And confused or not, our fellow Americans in Washington and Oregon are going through hell from weather we’re finding quite comfortable. Five people have died, and the National Guard and Coastguard have rescued over 160. Those states suffered 100 mph winds, torrential rain (compliments of La Nina), mudslides and flooding. People evacuated to hotels and then got stranded in those hotels. A four-lane highway in Washington, I-5, is under 10 feet of water in places. There is a 20-mile closure and detours across half the state.

The good news is all the rivers have peaked, and the rain has stopped as the system moves on to the Midwest where it’s turned to snow. N. Dakota may get 9 inches. That’s a pretty strong system that just holds on, keeps moving and changing.

http://www.sciencenews.org/pages/sn_arc99/10_30_99/fob5.htm

http://www.globalcomsatphone.com/articles/el_nino.html

http://www.blogsmonroe.com/world/?p=53

Share

One Year Anniversary of Fluke of Weather

Just a reminder to people that say global warming won’t affect them, and for people who think global warming is only a theory and the increasingly troubling weather patterns are just a fluke, one year ago on Friday the 13th, Buffalo, New York was hit by a so-called fluke. Call it what you want, 3 people died, 400,000 had no power, and 100 miles of interstate highway came to a halt stranding thousands because 2 feet of heavy snow snapped tree limbs, power lines, and telephone lines.

There has never been a fluke like this in Buffalo’s weather history since weather record keeping began 140 years ago. And Buffalo has some pretty messed up weather, so this is quite a statement! We’re having an awful lot of flukes that seem to be appearing closer and closer together. Pay attention as Mother Nature ups the ante. Bad weather may not be hitting your neighborhood right now, but eventually environmental conditions will change everywhere. We’re going to experience the very bad before it gets better and that’s only if we act immediately, which doesn’t seem to be the case.

Share